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Weekly Roundup: January 8, 2014



Along with promising a new smart bracelet, Intel showed off a 3D flying whale at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show.

Along with promising a new smart bracelet, Intel showed off a 3D flying whale at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show.

 

  • What shouldn’t you do on a plane? Ask jewelry designer Jenny Lauren, niece of Ralph Lauren, who threw a drunken, airborne fit so big her plane was diverted to Ireland.
  • Riccardo Tisci, creative director of Givenchy, unveiled the line’s new menswear collection this week in New York. Tisci called some of the prints “techno-ethnic,” explaining, “The overall feeling this season is elegant, yet urban.” We’ll try to keep that in mind.
  • In other Italian news, Milan-born, Houston-based Cathy Borlenghi collaborated with goldsmith and gemologist Antonella Aquilino to create this new line of Texas-inspired jewelry, based around baroque pearls.
  • Speaking of jewelry, wearable tech is all the rage this week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. And who better to create the next sophisticated smart bracelet than Intel and Opening Ceremony?
  • We’re all for comfort on the runway, but these designer shower slides may signal a slippery slump into sloppiness.
  • Vintage style alert: online vintage shopping mecca Atelier-Mayer may be changing hands. It’s not closing, just expanding. “People understand that we’re injecting new life into vintage,” said founder Carmen Haid.
  • Major women’s magazines are no longer just airbrushing out fat.
  • A few weeks ago, we reported that L.A.-based jeans manufacturer Not Your Daughter’s Jeans had been sold to the tune of $385 million. Now, NYDJ has a new CEO: Robert C. Skinner Jr., an alumnus of Smart Apparel US.
  • London’s O2 Arena will soon include a luxury outlet shopping center. No word on which labels have signed on, but there’s room for over 100.
  • Along with her smile and sense of humor, Kristen Stewart has lost her shirt in an uninspiring perfume campaign for Balenciaga.
  • Pour one out for L.A.-based indie store and fashion incubator FactoryLA, which has closed the doors to its one-year-old retail operation, showroom, and services.
  • Yet another reason to hero-worship Jay-Z—the music industry mogul’s collaboration with Barneys yielded over $1 million in profits, all of which is going to his Shawn Carter Foundation to help needy kids pay for college.
  • Charity through fashion is spreading. Designer and former missionary Andrew Van Asselt, moved by witnessing human trafficking in Mexico, has started a line called Coalition for Justice, which donates a percentage of proceeds to a safe house.
  • Hello, gorgeous: “12 Years a Slave” actress Lupita Nyong’o got her first major fashion magazine cover for W Magazine.

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Patterns of War
Patterns of War
War weaves itself deeply into the routine of the countries involved, significantly changing the design of everyday life. In America the patterns woven by WWII
Patterns of War
Ties of the 20s & 30s
Ties of the 20s & 30s
The history of the necktie is as rich and colorful as the patterns that adorn them. Designers, actors and royalty in the 1920s and 1930s left a distinctive stamp on the tie that gives the modern man the opportunity
Ties of the 20s & 30s
5 Cities // 5 Designers
5 Cities // 5 Designers
Emerging designers Min Wu (Suzhou, China), Ashley Austin (St. Louis, Missouri), Lilach Eliyahu (Tel Aviv, Israel), Ming Pin Tien (Taipei, Taiwan), and Jantine Van Peski (Breda, The Netherlands).
5 Cities // 5 Designers
Karlie | Robert Graham | Prada
Karlie | Robert Graham | Prada
Spotted on the floor: Charlie Brown of Karlie
Karlie | Robert Graham | Prada
Chinese Laundry | Miu Miu
Chinese Laundry | Miu Miu
We didn't catch her name (send us an email!!), but she is wearing a Nordstrom dress
Chinese Laundry | Miu Miu