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Ada Zanditon: Toeing the Line and Exceeding Expectation




If there is a line between high fashion and high art, it is the kind that only gets blurrier the closer you come to it. There are artists among us who blend the already blurred concepts with seeming great ease, while pushing the boundaries of the accepted aesthetic of even the grandest of fashion juries: London, Paris, New York, Milan. These artists, equipped with needle, thread, and a vision, decree with their creations a brazen maxim: The higher the fashion, the higher the art. And the higher the art, the higher the fashion.

At present, there is one artist who rises above the rest, a reigning priestess of bold sophistication and singular style: designer Ada Zanditon. After graduating from London’s College of Fashion in 2008, Zanditon has masterfully meshed high fashion and elevated art with each consecutive collection, all stemming from and interplaying with a chosen narrative to give her lines direction, motion, and structure.

A connoisseur of the geometric shape, Zanditon unabashedly produces wearable spheres and structured silhouettes, offset and enhanced by strikingly saturated hues. Her collections are shape and structure, circle and square, pyramid and triangle. Her lines seem to have neither ends nor beginnings, instead perpetuating themselves through the eyes of the viewer, with each form and shape daring you to seek out the next.

Zanditon’s garments are statements. They are not whimsical and waiflike but purposeful and regal, yet there is no place for rigidity in her pieces. Through informed structure, she manages to create balanced fluidity. Her pieces play on the tension of toeing that ambiguous line: the blurry, enigmatic stroke between high fashion and high art. How does one construct a spherical adornment to flatter a rectangular body? Or a pyramidal embellishment atop a square figure?

Season after season, Zanditon accepts the challenges such questions bring and steps in the direction of that ever-elusive dividing line. Holding it in taut suspension, her collections embrace the forms of high art and imbue them with functionality: high art turned haute fashion.

Take a look at www.adazanditon.com

By Rebecca Marshburn

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